Treatment Studies

The Therapeutic Brain Stimulation team is currently researching new treatments and conducting investigative studies for depression, bipolar, OCD, autism, schizophrenia, head injury and chronic pain. 

To read about our current research in these areas and to find out how to get involved, please see below. You can also view our Investigative Studies

 

Treatment Studies 

1. Accelerated TMS for depression

Aim: To see whether we can speed up the response to TMS. TMS response is usually slow, with a typical treatment course taking between four and six weeks. Over this time, patients are required to attend the hospital or clinic on a daily basis for a treatment that takes approximately 45 minutes. In this study we are investigating whether we can use a higher dose of treatment to get an accelerated treatment response, such that patient's symptoms improve in a much shorter period of time.

Participants: People with treatment-resistant depression  i.e. depression that has not adequately improved with antidepressant medications.

Project status: This project is currently underway.  

Contact details

Email: tms-enquiry@monash.edu

Phone: 9076 6595

 

2. DBS for treatment-resistant depression

Aim: To evaluate deep brain stimulation (DBS) in depression that has proved extremely resistant to standard treatments.

Methods: This study involves neurosurgical implantation of a neurostimulator in consenting patients who have severe depression that has proved extremely resistant to all less invasive antidepressant treatment options. 

Participants: As DBS is considered a treatment of last resort, only individuals who have trialled all less invasive antidepressant treatments and remained severely depressed can be considered for the procedure. This means having trialled multiple medications from all antidepressant drug classes, combinations of antidepressant medications, cognitive behavioural therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation and extensive electroconvulsive therapy (ECT).

Project status: This project is currently in progress.

Contact details:

Email: maprc-dbs@monash.edu

Phone: 9076 6564

 

3. MST for treatment resistant depression   

Aim: To evaluate magnetic seizure therapy (MST) for patients with depression that has proved extremely resistant to standard treatments.

Participants: People with depression that have proved extremely resistant to standard treatments.

Project status: This project is currently in progress.

Contact details

Lenore Wambeek

Email: tms-enquiry@monash.edu

Phone: (03) 9076 5186

 

4. TMS for the treatment of fibromyalgia

Aim: The aim of this study is to investigate the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) as a treatment for the symptoms of fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is a common condition producing substantial pain and disability. Preliminary research from overseas suggests that TMS may be effective in the treatment of fibromyalgia and other pain conditions.

Participants:To be involved, participants must be aged between 18 and 65 years and have a diagnosis of fibromyalgia. Participation will involve attending MAPrc for 20 TMS treatments over a four week period. Each treatment takes approximately 30 minutes. 

Project status: Recruitment underway.

Contact details

Dr Bernadette Fitzgibbon

Email: bernadette.fitzgibbon@monash.edu

Phone: (03) 9076 9860

 

5. Non-invasive brain stimulation in autism spectrum disorder (ASD)

Aim: We are currently conducting a number of studies that investigate whether transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) or transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) can be used to improve social and behavioural aspects of autism spectrum disorder.

Participants: Depending on the study, we are recruiting people aged between 14 and 40 who have a formal diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder.

Project status: Currently underway

Contact Details

A/Prof. Peter Enticott

Email: peter.enticott@deakin.edu.au

Phone: (03) 9244 5504

 MAPrc Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, Level 4, 607 St Kilda Road, Melbourne 3004

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